July 21, 2017

NEXT MEETING: July 21, 2017

A Peek at Our Economic Future

Joe Aaron is an Economic Futurist. A futurist identifies trends in society, and an economic futurist attempts to anticipate the economic impact of those trends. Trends identify themselves through exponential growth, not linear. The most common example of exponential growth is Moore’s Law named after the co-founder of Intel Corporation.

The two trends that will impact our economy the most over the next 10 to 15 years are the Electric Vehicle (EV) and the Autonomous Vehicle (AV). Together they will add two trillion dollars to our GDP, They will drive the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) into extinction and cause oil to retreat 20% from a “Peak Demand” of 100 million barrels a day before the end of the next decade.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

In case your pleasures tend toward those involving the stronger sensations, the San Ramon Rotary Club will be sponsoring a Whiskey and Cigar Tasting event at the Blackhawk Country Club in Danville, October 21. Plenty of time to prepare your taste buds.

Richmond Rotary was recently recognized at a Rotary Awards Dinner for having one of the top newsletters in the District. Kudos to the entire Flywheel team: Shana Bagley, David Cole, Nick Despota, Darlene Drapkin, Josh Genser, Jon Lawlis, Henry Moe, Shana Bagley, and Stacey Street.

MEETING OF July 14, 2017

Welcome

Newly-minted President Connie Tritt called the meeting to order and presided over the meeting in her first meeting in the capacity of Richmond Rotary President.

Connie took the occasion to remind us of our elevator speech. When people ask “What’s Rotary?”, we can lay it out this way:
“We’re a leadership organization of local business, professional and civic leaders. We meet regularly, get to know each other, form friendships, and through that, we’re able to get things done in this community.”

If it’s a long elevator ride, throw in the Four Way Test:
1. Is it the truth?
2. Is it fair to all concerned?
3. Will it build goodwill and better friendships?
4. Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

Visiting Rotarians and Guests

Stacey brought her daughter Alyssa Street to today’s meeting. Alan Bauer also brought his daughter Stephanie, who is the Interact President at her high school. She returned just the night before from community work in Nicaragua. And how’s this for a coincidence: Stephanie spent time teaching English in your scribe’s (Darlene’s) mom’s hometown of Estelí, in northern Nicaragua.

Recognitions and Happy/Sad Dollars

  • Ric Ambrose announced Darlene Drapkin’s 20th wedding anniversary. She celebrated “glamping” at Safari West in Santa Rosa. (Glamping is glamorous camping, not roughing it at all! Who knew?)
  • Bob traveled through Wyoming and also hit 4 weddings in Philadelphia and Virginia. He’s had enough weddings.
  • We’re glad Pam is back, alive and kicking after a hip replacement. She walked out the door of the hospital.
  • Jerry Feagley is happy that Larry Lewis is today’s guest speaker.
  • And Larry Lewis had a recognition of his own. He remembered our newest member, Cecilia Orozco, from Richmond High School.

Norm’s Nonsense

PROGRAM

Larry Lewis and the RIchmond Police Activities League

Larry Lewis, from Richmond Police Activities League, needed no introduction. He’s visited our club on numerous occasions and, outside of these meetings, has worked with a large number of our members. Richmond Rotarians have served on the RPAL board, while others have joined him on a wide range of community projects. He gave shout-outs to members in the room, including Mey Saechao, Cecilia Orozco, Darlene Drapkin and Josh Genser, acknowledging their collaboration over the years.

Larry singled out Erle Brown, saying that Erle and the Boys Club were like family to him. Every time he did well or badly, Earl was there to praise him or let him have it.

Larry’s first job was with the Richmond Boy’s Club, where he became Executive Director at the age of 21. He could have worked in the City but he chose to enter the Police Department because, he joked, he could run well.

RPAL has brought into its programs 120 truant young people— kids who ditch school, are picked up, and then sent to RPAL. Rules and regulations enforce a daytime curfew that keeps kids on a steady path toward maturity. RPAL provides the young people with services that can help keep then motivated in positive ways and stay out of jail—and graveyards.

Larry is grateful that there are other programs for Richmond youth, like RISE, YES, and the YMCA. Taken together, these programs offer positive guidance and engagement with everything from college prep and money management, to robotics learning and field trips to locations beyond.

Larry finished by listing a number of ways you can help.

  • Visit the RPAL website: http://www.rpal.org
  • Contact RPAL (510) 621-1221
  • Support our Cops and Kids
  • Become a Mentor
  • Become a Carnival Ride sponsor with your name on the ride
  • Make a pledge today!

Darlene Drapkin, Rotating Scribe